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Pont Notre Dame

Pont Notre Dame

The Pont Notre-Dame is located at one of the oldest historical crossing points on the Seine. n ancient times, a structure called Grand Pont occupied the site of the present bridge, on the large branch of the Seine, in the axis of the present day Rue Saint-Martin.
During the Norman invasions in the 9th century, this structure was replaced by the "Planches de Mibray" bridge, so named because of the planks which covered the marshy ground on its approaches.
This bridge was finally swept away by the floods of 1406 and on 31st May 1413, Charles VI ordered the building of the first bridge to be called Notre-Dame, a wooden structure 106 m long and 27 m wide, carrying sixty houses. This bridge was then famous for its armouries and its bookshops. Alas! on 28th October 1499, despite the alert given by a carpenter, it suddenly collapsed.The Pont Notre-Dame is located at one of the oldest historical crossing points on the Seine. In ancient times, a structure called Grand Pont occupied the site of the present bridge, on the large branch of the Seine, in the axis of the present day Rue Saint-Martin.
During the Norman invasions in the 9th century, this structure was replaced by the "Planches de Mibray" bridge, so named because of the planks which covered the marshy ground on its approaches. This bridge was finally swept away by the floods of 1406 and on 31st May 1413, Charles VI ordered the building of the first bridge to be called Notre-Dame, a wooden structure 106 m long and 27 m wide, carrying sixty houses. This bridge was then famous for its armouries and its bookshops. Alas! on 28th October 1499, despite the alert given by a carpenter, it suddenly collapsed.
In 1507, a new six-arch bridge 124 m long and 23 m wide was erected and houses were again built on it. From the 16th to the 17th centuries, this bridge was one of the most heavily frequented places in the capital, and in 1660 was renovated and decorated to honour the arrival in Paris of Marie-Thrse of Austria, wife of Louis XIV. It was to last for more than a century, although in 1786, its by now unsteady and insalubrious houses were demolished.
In 1853, further to the decision to lower the level of the Rue Saint-Martin, a new stone bridge with five arches with a span of 17m to 19 m was built on the foundations of the previous bridge.
Shortly afterwards, in 1858, the hydraulic pump designed to supply Seine river water to a number of surrounding Parisian fountains was also demolished. This bridge was obviously not to the liking of the river users, since no less than thirty five accidents are recorded at this point between 1891 and 1910, which earned it the nickname "Devil's bridge". Finally, to improve the f low of the river and satisfy river users, the three middle arches were replaced by a single metal arch. The converted structure was inaugurated in 1919 by the President of the Republic, Raymond Poincar.

 
Contractors


Gariel (stonework of 1853)
Dayde (metal arch of 1912)


Construction date


1853 - 1912


Total length
105 m


Usable width
20m; 12 m roadway; two pavements of 4 m


Construction principles


60 m metal arch, flanked by two stone arches retained from the previous bridge built in 1853.


Piers
Built on wooden piles


Address

 
Quai de Gesvres
Quai de la Corse
75001 Paris


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mise à jour le : 18 décembre 2013
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